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#PRFAIL: Fake Stores “Caught Red Handed”

This article is pulled from the JoTo PR Disruptors Report. Subscribe here to not miss out.

 

Would you ever steal Apple’s branding for your store so you could sell some off-brand computers?1 I’m talking the same color wood for your information kiosks that use stark white cords to charge your products?

No? I thought so.

Several years ago, 22 fake “Apple stores” popped up around Shenzhen to sell their computer products.2 It didn’t stop there, though, fake IKEA stores appeared in other parts of China selling fake versions of Nike, Disney, and even McDonald’s products.

A little closer to home here in America, if you walk into any CVS or Walgreens you’re bound to see salon quality products marked much cheaper than salon prices. How? Some are fakes, but the majority of them are “gray market” leftovers which have past expiration dates but are fixed with their own UPCs and then selling them.3

What about some other companies that have tipped the truth scale in the wrong way and into the FAKE NEWS world.

Back in 2012 do you remember when Skechers released a new type of shoe, “Shape-Ups,” that were marketed to help burn calories and sculpt thighs. Obviously, gym-goers everywhere called them out and the FTC stepped in and proved the falsity of the ads.4 They came to a $40 million settlement. Ouch. Sorry people, you have to work to burn calories.

Photo Credit: Richard G.

Naked Juice was hit with a similar tale of falsehood when they were slammed for using “100% Fruit,” “All-Natural” and “Non-GMO,” on their packaging. Ingredients ended up not all-natural but they also included a genetically modified version of soy; naughty juice company, naughty. 5

Recently, social media giant, Snapchat settled with the FTC over claims that photos shared on this platform disappeared completely. This wasn’t the case as they weren’t “completely” gone and saving someone else’s photos was relatively easy. Snapchat apologized for not being 100% transparent on the issues but the damage was done.Oopsie.

It’s common to think that “FAKE NEWS IS EVERYWHERE.”

IT’S ALSO A LIE.

Certain vested interests want others to be misinformed. Propagandists are redefining words, blowing things ups, makes things bigger than you think. “You Can’t Trust Anyone..”A common generality designed to create hate and division.

It’s all fire and brimstone.

There are more trustworthy media out there than ever before and they are popping up every week.

Here’s a snapshot: the media database that my firm utilizes has 1.6 million media contacts (and growing) – all in real-time – with 20,000 updates per day to ensure the most current and complete information, so we can find the most relevant journalists and analysts to cover our clients’ stories.

Our different newswires go out to tens of thousands of journalists representing over one hundred thousand-plus media outlets. This doesn’t even include our database of new bloggers coming on the line, podcasters, and social media influencers.

So yes. The media isn’t going under—it’s just getting bigger and the audiences are following suit.

RECAP: FAKE NEWS is an opportunity and is opening the door to new news outlets who are disrupting the industry and bringing more competition to the media industry. There are now many more news outlets that cater to specific groups of people targeted specifically to whom you want to reach.

There’s a world of good happening out there that needs to be known to the public – way more than the bad. There are lots of good stories that need to be told and there’s a lot of ethical businesses out there that can grow with the right exposure and direction… and that’s exactly what we at JoTo PR are doing for the economy, country, and the world.

FAKE NEWS. It’s an opportunity. Disruption always is.

 

1 R., Richard. “You’ll Never Guess Where This Fake Starbucks Is Located.” About.com. N.p., 04 Nov. 2016. Web. 23 Mar. 2017.
2 R., Richard. “You’ll Never Guess Where This Fake Starbucks Is Located.” About.com. N.p., 04 Nov. 2016. Web. 23 Mar. 2017.
3 R., Richard. “You’ll Never Guess Where This Fake Starbucks Is Located.” About.com. N.p., 04 Nov. 2016. Web. 23 Mar. 2017.
4 Hiscott, Rebecca. “8 Companies That Sold You Lies.” The Huffington Post. TheHuffingtonPost.com, 16 May 2014. Web. 03 Apr. 2017.
5 Hiscott, Rebecca. “8 Companies That Sold You Lies.” The Huffington Post. TheHuffingtonPost.com, 16 May 2014. Web. 03 Apr. 2017.
6 Hiscott, Rebecca. “8 Companies That Sold You Lies.” The Huffington Post. TheHuffingtonPost.com, 16 May 2014. Web. 03 Apr. 2017.
Image sources:
https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8358/28500473612_6deaee2557_b.jpg
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/ef/IKEA_Shenzhen.jpg